Andy Smith
MIne-action specialist
 

Mined area Indicators – Other common AP mines (in Angola)

 

 

Sheet 49   Other common AP mines (in Angola)

There are very many types of mine in Angola and fewer than half are shown in this training resource. The picture shows a few other mines and illustrates some of the various explosive used.

A – An M14 blast mine with its arming clip alongside it. The M14 is a minimum-metal mine 46mm in diameter
(about 2¼”). It contains 29g Tetryl.

B – An M14 mine with its arming clip in place. The M14 is normally olive green when made, but fades as shown in these pictures.

C – The TS-50 blast mine can be very difficult to detect. The amount of metal in it varies according to customer’s specifications. The plastic bodied mine is 90mm in diameter (about 3½”) and contains 50g RDX. It has a large plastic arming cap and can be in many colours, although usually sand or olive green. 

D – The front side of an APM-1 directional fragmentation mine. The plastic mine is 140mm long (about 5½”) and contains 360g Composition-B and about 280 5mm ball bearings.

E – An example of the PRB-M35 blast mine. This plastic bodied minimum metal mine contains 100g TNT and measures 65mm in diameter (about 2½”). Its arming pin is shown alongside it.

F – The VS-50 blast mine can be very difficult to detect. The amount of metal in it varies according to customer’s specifications. The plastic bodied mine is 90mm in diameter (about 3½”) and contains 43g RDX. It often has a red plastic arming ring or clip that may be discarded when laid. Like the TS-50, it was made in many colours but is usually sand or olive green.

G – The VAR-40 blast mine with an example of its arming cap above it. The plastic arming cap was from an olive green example, while the mine shown is sand coloured. This plastic minimum-metal mine is 78mm in diameter (just over 3”) and contains 40g RDX or Composition-B.

H – The rear side of the APM-1 directional fragmentation mine described at D above.

I – This is a PP Mi- Sr bounding fragmentation mine with an MUV-2 fuze. The mine is metal cased and 102mm in diameter (about 4”).

J – This is a rusting example of a Type-69 bounding fragmentation mine with an MUV-series fuze. The mine is metal cased and 61mm in diameter (about 2½”). It contains 105g TNT.

K – This plastic cased mine is known as the “Cuban Anti-Personnel Mine”. It is a plastic box measuring 245 x91mm (about 5 3/4" x 3½”). It contains a large block of TNT (shown at letter M on this page) weighing approximately 300g.

L – Two cast rods of TNT as used in the POMZ and PMR series of fragmentation mines. Note the pre-cast hole for the detonator.

M – The large block of TNT used in the Cuban Anti-Personnel mine shown at letter K. Note the plastic insert in the hole where the detonator fits.

N -  The 110g HE ring from a PPM-2 blast mine. The colour of the various high explosives varies widely.

O – On the left, the TNT explosive in a MAI-75 blast mine. On the right, the RDX explosive from a VS-50 blast mine.

P – A paper wrapped 200g block of TNT.

 

 

Mined area
warning signs

 

Areas without
signs

 

Informal
warning
signs

 

Roads in
rural areas

 

 

Improvised devices
on roads

 

Surveyor's stick
scene

 

Fighter plane
scenario

 

Abandoned
grazing land

 

Tank
Scene

 

 

Washout
Scene

 

Embankment
Scene

 

Destroyed
train

 

Abandoned
building

 

Transporter
Scene

 

Angola bush
Scene

 

Power-line
Scene

 

Burnt-off
area

 

Trench
Scene

 

 

Angola
bush 2

 

OZM
Scene

 

Small
fuzes

 

 

How mines
age

 

Other common
AP mines

 

Other common
ordnance

 

Other common
indicators

 

Ammunition
dump

 

Mine
injuries

 

TEACHING
NOTES
*.doc

 

TEACHING
NOTES
*.pdf