Andy Smith
MIne-action specialist
 

Mined area Indicators – Burnt-off area

 

 

Sheet 39     Burnt off area
(Page 1)

The picture shows an area where the undergrowth was recently burnt off. A line of mixed blast mines were laid across the area to prevent troop movements some years ago.

Two mines are clearly visible in the picture. They show how mines are often not buried but laid on the surface or in a shallow pit  This is especially true when there is grass cover to conceal them.

Suggested messages:

  • Many mines are not buried in the ground when they are laid. This makes it possible to see parts of them.
  • Even when mines are visible they can be very hard to spot.
  • Keep to well used roads and paths when moving through an unfamiliar area.
  • Consult local people before leaving the paths. Local people often know where mines have been planted.

 
Sheet 40     Burnt off area
(Page 2)


The red arrows in the picture point to the clues that were clearly visible. From the left these are:

  1. The arming clip from a MAI-75 blast mine.
  2. A PMN blast mine with its rubber top damaged by fire.
  3. A MAI-75 blast mine slightly tilted on the ground and covered with dirt that makes it very hard to see.

The other pictures show:

A – A MAI-75 blast mine that has been unscrewed to show the explosive inside. The detonator is missing. The MAI-75 is 95mm in diameter (about 3¾”) with a plastic case that is black or brown. It contains 120g of TNT.

B – A MAI-75 blast mine seen from above with its arming clip still in place. Another arming clip is shown alongside it.

C –  A PMN mine seen from above with its arming pin still in place. Other arming pins are shown beneath it. The PMN blast mine is 112mm in diameter (about 4½”) and contains 240g TNT. The body of the mine is bakelite and the top is rubber.

D –  A PMN blast mine with the top removed to show the explosive inside. The TNT has been sealed with black laquer.

E – A PMN mine viewed from the side.

F –  A MAI-75 mine viewed from the side.

Suggested messages:

  • Blast mines are not always buried.
  • Even when mines are visible they can be very hard to see.
  • Mines are often very durable and will remain able to function for many years.
  • Keep to well used roads and paths when moving through an unfamiliar area.

 

Mined area
warning signs

 

Areas without
signs

 

Informal
warning
signs

 

Roads in
rural areas

 

 

Improvised devices
on roads

 

Surveyor's stick
scene

 

Fighter plane
scenario

 

Abandoned
grazing land

 

Tank
Scene

 

 

Washout
Scene

 

Embankment
Scene

 

Destroyed
train

 

Abandoned
building

 

Transporter
Scene

 

Angola bush
Scene

 

Power-line
Scene

 

Burnt-off
area

 

Trench
Scene

 

 

Angola
bush 2

 

OZM
Scene

 

Small
fuzes

 

 

How mines
age

 

Other common
AP mines

 

Other common
ordnance

 

Other common
indicators

 

Ammunition
dump

 

Mine
injuries

 

TEACHING
NOTES
*.doc

 

TEACHING
NOTES
*.pdf