Andy Smith
MIne-action specialist
 

Mined area Indicators – Power-line

 

 

Sheet 37     Power line
(Page 1)

The picture shows a power line that has been mined to prevent it being sabotaged. The line has been damaged by small arms fire and is no longer carrying electricity. The photograph was taken from a road which runs close beside the power line for a short way.

The area around the pylon and under the wire is more overgrown than other places. This is an indication that the area has not been used for some time and may be mined.

One mine is clearly visible in the picture.

Suggested message(s):

  • People should be aware that power lines will have been targets during the war and so are likely to have been defended with mines.
  • The area around the base of power line pylons can be especially dangerous.
  • When you can identify one area that may be dangerous, do not presume that areas nearby will be safe.

 

Sheet 38      Power line
(Page 2)

The left hand side of the picture shows a MRUD directional fragmentation mine on the back of the baobab tree.  The MRUD measures 231mm from side to side (about 9”). This plastic cased mine contains many steel fragments that spray out from it when it is initiated. It can be activated by tripwires or by a person using an electrical initiator from a distance.

Beside the MRUD are examples of the kind of tripwire spool found in Angola . These may be discarded when mines and wires are placed.

The right hand side of the picture shows that the area between the tree and the power line has also been mined. The mines used are the Gyata-64 (on the left and the PMN (on the right). Examples of the arming pins that may be discarded when these mines are placed are shown with them.

The Gyata-64 blast mine is 106mm in diameter (about 4¼”) and contains 300g TNT. The body of the mine is a hard plastic called Bakelite and the top is rubber.

The PMN blast mine is 112mm in diameter (about 4½”) and contains 240g TNT. The body of the mine is Bakelite and the top is rubber.

When the area was cleared, more PMN mines were found in a pattern around the base of the pylon.

Suggested message(s):

  • When you are assessing an area, do not let innocent details such as birds or flowers distract you.
  • Mines are not easy to see even when they are clearly visible.
  • Power lines are likely to have been defensively mined. Approaches to the power line may also have been mined.
  • The pressure plates of some mines are black rubber and very hard to see even when exposed.
  • The pressure plates of some mines are much bigger than others.
  • When you have identified that one area may be dangerous, do not assume that other areas nearby will be safe.
  • Mines that are initiated by stepping on them are often put near to tripwire initiated mines.

 

 

Mined area
warning signs

 

Areas without
signs

 

Informal
warning
signs

 

Roads in
rural areas

 

 

Improvised devices
on roads

 

Surveyor's stick
scene

 

Fighter plane
scenario

 

Abandoned
grazing land

 

Tank
Scene

 

 

Washout
Scene

 

Embankment
Scene

 

Destroyed
train

 

Abandoned
building

 

Transporter
Scene

 

Angola bush
Scene

 

Power-line
Scene

 

Burnt-off
area

 

Trench
Scene

 

 

Angola
bush 2

 

OZM
Scene

 

Small
fuzes

 

 

How mines
age

 

Other common
AP mines

 

Other common
ordnance

 

Other common
indicators

 

Ammunition
dump

 

Mine
injuries

 

TEACHING
NOTES
*.doc

 

TEACHING
NOTES
*.pdf