Andy Smith
MIne-action specialist
 

Mined area Indicators – Abandoned grazing land

 


Sheet 21   Abandoned grazing land
(Page 1)

The picture shows an area of abandoned grazing land that is becoming overgrown with low bush. Several years ago, tripwire mines were laid in the area to prevent enemy access to a nearby road.

There are no obvious indications of danger except that the land is abandoned. A PMR fragmentation mine with a tripwire is just visible in the foreground.

Suggested message(s):

  •   When travelling in an unknown area, keep to paths and roads.
  •   Although there has not been fighting in an area for a long time, that does not mean that the area is safe.

Sheet 22  Abandoned grazing land
(Page 2)

The red arrows point to the mines in the scene. The one in front is visible in the big photograph but the one behind it is not.

Both mines are PMRs. These may be PMR1 or PMR-2A versions. They look the same but the PMR-2A has a larger explosive content. Both mines can seriously injure or kill at more than 30 meters.

Suggested message(s):

  • When travelling in an unknown area, keep to paths and roads.
  • Even when a mine is visible, it can be very hard to see. If you see one mine and try to walk around it, you may walk into another mine or pull a tripwire.
  • Although there has not been fighting an area for a long time, that does not mean that the area is safe.
  • If you see evidence of tripwire mines, there may be blast mines nearby.

The pictures show the following:

A – A POMZ-2 fragmentation mine body that is 130mm tall (about 5”). This is made from cast iron and the fuze and detonator assembly is pushed into the top. The fuze is usually a tripwire initiated MUV type. The mine has six rows of fragmentation ridges and a “neck” to help hold the fuze in place.

B – A POMZ-2M fragmentation mine body that is 107mm tall (about 4¼”). This is made from cast iron and the fuze and detonator assembly screws into the top. The fuze is usually a tripwire initiated MUV type. This mine has five rows of fragmentation ridges and a threaded hole in the top.

C – A PMR-2A fragmentation mine body that is 140mm tall (about 5½”). This is made from cast iron and the fuze and detonator assembly screws into a plastic insert on the top. The fuze is usually a tripwire initiated UPM type. This mine has nine rows of fragmentation ridges and a black plastic insert in the top.

D – Stakes used with tripwire initiated mines. One end of the tripwire is attached to the stake, the other to the firing pin in the fuze on the mine. Stakes are often positioned close to another mine so that tripwires overlap. One stake shown is wooden, the other metal. The presence of tripwire stakes is a clear indication of the presence of tripwire initiated devices. Even if the tripwires had broken or rusted, or some mines have been let off, the area is very dangerous. Blast mines may have been laid around the mine, the tripwire and the stake to prevent them being removed by the enemy.

E – A PMR-2A fragmentation mine on a wooden stake with an UPM-2A fuze and a plastic coated tripwire.

F – A PMR-2A fragmentation mine on a wooden stake with an UPM-1 fuze. This is the mine that can be seen in the foreground of the picture.

G – Examples of the tripwires and spools that may be found in Angola . Tripwire spools may be thrown away when the wire is used and can indicate the presence of tripwire initiated devices.

 

 

Mined area
warning signs

 

Areas without
signs

 

Informal
warning
signs

 

Roads in
rural areas

 

 

Improvised devices
on roads

 

Surveyor's stick
scene

 

Fighter plane
scenario

 

Abandoned
grazing land

 

Tank
Scene

 

 

Washout
Scene

 

Embankment
Scene

 

Destroyed
train

 

Abandoned
building

 

Transporter
Scene

 

Angola bush
Scene

 

Power-line
Scene

 

Burnt-off
area

 

Trench
Scene

 

 

Angola
bush 2

 

OZM
Scene

 

Small
fuzes

 

 

How mines
age

 

Other common
AP mines

 

Other common
ordnance

 

Other common
indicators

 

Ammunition
dump

 

Mine
injuries

 

TEACHING
NOTES
*.doc

 

TEACHING
NOTES
*.pdf