Andy Smith
MIne-action specialist
 

Mined area Indicators – Angola: Fighter plane

 

 

Sheet 18         Fighter plane
(Page 1)

The picture shows a fighter plane at the edge of an abandoned military airstrip in the bush. The plane has no engine and most useful parts were taken before it was abandoned.

Because the area was used by soldiers, there are some dangerous items lying around. Also, when the airstrip was abandoned, some mines were laid to prevent the area being used by the enemy.

S uggested message(s):

  • The general public should always avoid abandoned or battle-damaged military equipment.
  • Do not let your curiosity lead you into danger.
  • It is unlikely that anything of value will have been left behind. If it has, the departing fighters may have left it to tempt people into danger.

 

Sheet 19         Fighter plane
(Page 2)

When the area round the plane was cleared, the deminers found several things shown on the picture.

  1. To the left of the plane they found discarded rifle grenades.
  2. In front of the plane they found Type 72 anti-personnel blast mines.
  3. Beside the plane on the right there was a directional fragmentation mine attached to a post. This mine had been set up so that it could be fired electrically if the enemy came too close. The wire and initiation system was also found.
  4. Beneath the wing of the plane they found a tin of rifle ammunition and some rifle magazines.

S uggested message(s):

  •  The general public should always avoid abandoned or battle-damaged military equipment.
  •   Do not let your curiosity lead you into danger.
  •   It is unlikely that anything of value will have been left behind. If it has, the departing fighters may have left it to tempt people into danger.


Sheet 20           Fighter plane
(Page 3)

A directional fragmentation mine was found beside the fighter plane. The picture above shows other directional fragmentations mines and things that may indicate their presence.

Directional fragmentation mines fire fragments from one side of the mine. The people using the mine stay behind it. For this reason the mines are often used on the perimeter of military installations or in ambushes.

The mines can be set up so that they are operated by tripwire or by command detonation using a detonator attached to electric wires. At close range, most of these mines are powerful enough to fire fragments that will penetrate cars and civilian vehicles.

The pictures above show the following:

A – An MRUD directional fragmentation mine attached to a tree. The mine has a tripwire fuze attached and also an electrical initiation system.

B – The bag in which a MRUD mine may be issued. This may be discarded when the mine is placed.

C – The plastic transit caps that are used to protect the detonator and the fuze-wells before the MRUD is used. These may be thrown aside when a mine is prepared for use.

D – A MRUD directional fragmentation mine that measures 231mm from side to side (about 9”). This plastic cased mine can be attached to trees and posts, or can stand on its folding legs. It is always positioned above ground, but may have fallen to the ground if it has been in place a long time.

E – A MON-50 directional fragmentation mine with an NM electrical initiator fitted. One of the transit caps for the fuze options is shown above. This plastic cased mine measures 266mm from side to side (about 9”), has folding “legs” and a swivel joint with a tree spike and clamp. This mine is always positioned above ground, but may have fallen if it has been in place a long time.

F – A MON-100 directional fragmentation mine with no fuze fitted in its central fuze-well. This 236mm diameter (about 9½”) metal cased mine is attached to a metal bracket fitted with a tree spike. This mine is always positioned above ground, but may have fallen if it has been in place a long time.

G – Three types of hand operated generators that make the current to fire an electrical initiator.

H – An NM electrical initiator that is attached to a detonator and used to trigger an explosive device.

I – An MUV fuze and the parts that may fall away from it when it is armed. This kind of trip-wire operated fuze can be used in a wide range of mines and booby traps. The fuze shown has a detonator attached.

J – A “Shrapnel mine No.2” from the front and from the back. The mine is 220mm (about 8 ½”) from side to side. This plastic cased directional fragmentation mine has had some of the back removed to show the explosive and the matric of ball bearings at the front of the mine.

K – A metal spool of tripwire. Both the spool and wire are painted green.

 

Mined area
warning signs

 

Areas without
signs

 

Informal
warning
signs

 

Roads in
rural areas

 

 

Improvised devices
on roads

 

Surveyor's stick
scene

 

Fighter plane
scenario

 

Abandoned
grazing land

 

Tank
Scene

 

 

Washout
Scene

 

Embankment
Scene

 

Destroyed
train

 

Abandoned
building

 

Transporter
Scene

 

Angola bush
Scene

 

Power-line
Scene

 

Burnt-off
area

 

Trench
Scene

 

 

Angola
bush 2

 

OZM
Scene

 

Small
fuzes

 

 

How mines
age

 

Other common
AP mines

 

Other common
ordnance

 

Other common
indicators

 

Ammunition
dump

 

Mine
injuries

 

TEACHING
NOTES
*.doc

 

TEACHING
NOTES
*.pdf